Category: Social Media

Webinar: How How Global Legal and Technology Changes Affect Records Management

I just finished writing a report at the IGI that is a broad survey of market, legal, and technology developments that affect records retention and management practices. Some interesting things going on around the globe. For example, in April 2013, the UK abolished its primary financial regulator, the Financial Services Authority, and replaced it with two new regulatory bodies: the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) and the Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA). According to Steven Formica, CEO of Fontis International, a provider of global legal data for records retention schedules, this reform resulted in extensive changes to records retention requirements. For example, Steve’s firm replaced 104 existing records retention legal requirements related to the FSA with 686 new entries based on the requirements of the FCA/PRA.  This kind of increased specificity and scrutiny on records retention is happening in the US and around the globe.

In any case, I will be discussing the paper and its key findings on a webinar hosted by Recall at 2 pm ET on March 25th, 2014. Click here to find out more and register to attend. The paper will be available for download immediately after the webinar.

 

 

Let’s Celebrate Global Information Governance Day

Thursday February 20th, 2014 is the second annual Global Information Governance Day. We established #GIGD to raise awareness of information governance across the globe. See the Wikipedia entry for more information.

Success in information governance can only be achieved by challenging and changing the way we see information. This is why Global Information Day is useful: it will help to raise awareness of the critical importance of information governance.

As you celebrate Global Information Governance Day with your friends and family, here are some key points to remember:

  1. Over half of the information many organizations create and keep is redundant, outdated junk.
  2. Keeping this digital junk around only wastes capital that could be deployed elsewhere – to create jobs, for example – and unnecessarily harms the environment through massive electricity waste.
  3. The failure to manage burgeoning digital information is a demonstrable threat to the civil and criminal justice system due to the out-of-control costs of electronic discovery. Many cases and investigations are settled rather than properly adjudicated simply because the cost of finding and producing digital evidence is unreasonably high.
  4. The global failure to properly classify unstructured information is represents a growing threat to individual privacy. Every day your private information and mine is at risk of theft and unauthorized disclosure by the companies and governance agencies because they lack consistent and cost-effective techniques to separate personally identifiable information from non-private information.

How can you celebrate Global Information Governance Day? Here are some ideas:

  • Chip away at your email inbox to try and achieve Inbox Zero.
  • Clean up and shut down an old departmental shared drive, just for fun.
  • Drink some herbal tea, read Zen Buddhism for Dummies, and try not to panic when you think about how big the problem is at your organization.
  • Take six or seven hours and try to explain to your friends and family, what exactly do you do for a living again anyway?
  • Participate in the first annual Global Information Governance Day Twitter chat.

In honor of Global Information Governance Day, I will be participating in a Twitter chat hosted by @RSDig at 11 am EST on February 20th, 2014 along with several other information governance experts. Hashtag is #GIGD. See you there.

2014 ABA Information Governance, E-Discovery and Digital Evidence Conference

Next week don’t miss the 2014 American Bar Association Information Governance, Electronic Discovery and Digital Evidence National Institute at Stetson’s Tampa Law Center in Tampa, Florida, on January 28-31, 2014. I spoke at this event last year, and was supposed to speak again this year, but had a conflict so I will unfortunately not be there. Unfortunate for me, at least. The attendees will probably be fine without me.

This is an event star-studded with e-discovery and information governance luminaries and judges. It is a casual setting, with lots of opportunities to chat with real decision-makers (i.e., judges) and experts who are mapping the future of information governance. Plus, Tampa is a pretty nice place to escape to this time of year. Unless you are from Tampa, in which case, well, you get to sleep in your own bed. And don’t forget to go to Berns (take the tour, it is worth it).

Click here for more information and to register.