Category: Videos

Announcing The Information Governance Initiative

Three years ago, I sat down in a conference room in Washington, D.C with some really smart people and we quickly realized that we shared a vision for a consortium and think tank devoted to advancing Information Governance. Each of us had seen the incredible value that better information governance could create for their respective clients, but had also witnessed the consequences of information failure first-hand. Without a way for IG practitioners to share their experience across disciplines, it seemed unlikely that the promise of information governance would be fulfilled. Today, thanks to the support of like-minded individuals and organizations, this vision has been realized.

I am so pleased to announce the launch of the Information Governance Initiative (IGI), a cross-disciplinary consortium and think tank focused on advancing information governance. The IGI will publish research, benchmarking surveys, and guidance for practitioners on its website at www.IGInitiative.com. The research will be freely available, and the group will also be providing an online community designed to foster discussion and networking among practitioners.

I am founder and executive director, and it would be great if you would join us.

Our Mission

I believe information can be a positive transformative force in the world – improving business, government, and the lives of people in all walks of life. But I also believe that these benefits are not automatic, and in fact will only be the result of sustained, proactive efforts to understand and manage information in a better way. I believe that there is a need for like-minded people to come together and find this better way. A forum for ideas, facts, and techniques. An initiative that pushes the market forward and builds information literacy.

That’s why we created the Information Governance Initiative – and why we want you to be a part of it.

Who We Are

I founded the IGI along with Bennett B. Borden. I am the executive director, Bennett is the organization’s chair, and Jason R. Baron is co-chair. Jay Brudz is general counsel.

The IGI Advisory Board is comprised of members drawn from the disciplines that own the facets of information governance including information security, data science and analytics, e-discovery, business management, IT management, compliance, business intelligence, records management, finance and audit, privacy, and risk management. We are also developing a Corporate Council comprised of practitioners working in IG. Contact us if you are interested in participating in the Corporate Council.

At launch, IGI Advisory Board members include Courtney Ingraffia Barton, senior counsel, global privacy at Hilton Worldwide, Inc.; Julie Colgan, president of ARMA International; Leigh Isaacs, VP of the information governance Peer Group at ILTA; and Richard Stiennon, chief research analyst at IT-Harvest and well-known cybersecurity expert. Additional board members are being added on an ongoing basis.

Our Supporters

The IGI is launching with broad support from leading providers of information governance products and services, including:

We are also partnering with a variety of organizations to bring IG stakeholders from different disciplines together to work on the information governance problem. For example, we have partnered with The CFO Alliance, a community of over 4,000 senior finance professionals, to bring the IG conversation to the finance community. ARMA International has appointed a representative to the IGI Advisory Board, and the two organizations plan on working together to advance the adoption of information governance. In addition, the IGI will be presenting several sessions on information governance at the Managing Electronic Records conference in Chicago, May 19-21, 2014.

Get Involved in the IGI

Members of the leadership team are speaking about information governance at nine different sessions during the LegalTech NY 2014 conference between February 4-6th. If you are there, come see us and also visit our Charter Supporters in the exhibit halls.

Learn how you can get involved in the IGI at, www.IGInitiative.com

I also invite organizations interested in supporting the advancement of Information Governance to contact me at 646 450 4468 or barclay.blair@IGIniative.com.

Video: Fear and Greed in Information Governance

Last week I was lucky enough to spend a day working with my friend Jay Brudz (a partner at Drinker Biddle who also runs their e-discovery sub with IG guru Bennett Borden). Whenever we had a spare moment our conversation would drift back to our favorite topic: is Information Governance about risk or value?

The correct answer, of course, is both. But not always, and not at the same time.

First of all, on a macroeconomic level, the pendulum is always swinging between fear and greed/risk and value. Sometimes organizations circle the wagons,  trim the fat, and break out a litany of clichés to cloak the fact that they are running scared. At other times, organizations light fat cigars, buy fancy umbrella holders, and spend money like the value of an American house will never decline.

So, there are macroeconomic factors that determine, generally, what motivates corporate spending and where management attention is focused.

This tension between risk and value is also driven by corporate culture. Some companies are simply more conservative than others –  even those of similar size in the same vertical –  and as such are more concerned about understanding and managing risk. Some companies build this conservatism into their marketing – especially in the financial services industry, where risk management and compliance typically has its own department (although the power of that office varies widely).

CEOs sometimes have a mandate to change existing cultures –  including attitudes towards risk – as Paul O’Neill did at Alcoa by announcing, “I intend to make Alcoa the safest company in America,” at his first investor meeting as new CEO (as detailed by Charles Duhigg in “The Power of Habit.”) Sometimes, of course, new CEOs mistake coupon-clipping clothing buyers for Apple fanboys and flame out spectacularly.

Industry vertical and market focus, however, are probably the biggest determinants.  Predictably, large, regulated companies who are frequently litigated generally spend more time and money on understanding and managing risk.

But fear only gets you so far, even in the most risk-aware organization. Fear alone will not drive employees to change their information habits. It won’t stop them from hoarding information in “their” shared drive (or shared drive in the cloud) or their email account. It will not stop them from classifying all their documents in the multi-million dollar document management system as “Misc-Other.” It will not stop them from using the cloud service recommended to them by their neighbor to share customer documents with a service provider. Fear will not change information governance behavior in a sustainable way.

So what will?

In Duhigg’s telling it wasn’t fear of safety failures that ultimately changed and sustained the safety culture at Alcoa, but rather the subsequent growth and the success of the company under O’Neill’s reign that corresponded with his focus on safety.

“I knew I had to transform Alcoa . . . but you can’t order people to change. That’s not how the brain works. So I decided I was going to start by focusing on one thing. If I could start disrupting the habits around one thing, it would spread throughout the entire company.” Paul O’Neill, as quoted by Charles Duhigg.

Driving sustainable change is about changing habits, but it is also about appealing to employee self-interest. Providing the employee with tools that help them do their job better, faster, smarter so that they can succeed and be rewarded. But also ensuring that these solutions take care of the company’s business and legal needs –  ideally in the background.

I addressed this question recently in the short video below.  

Hanging Out and Chatting About Information Governance

This week I had a chat using Google Hangouts with Bill Tolson of Recommind about the use of machine-based learning technologies in information governance. Check it out below.

Video: The Leadership Vacuum in Information Governance

As regular readers know, one of my favorite topics is the leadership vacuum in information governance. Who really is steering the ship in most organizations? Is it the CIO? It it the legal department? Is it a new leader like a Chief Digital Officer? This is a critical question, and you should be asking it. I provide some further thoughts on this topic in the video below –  check it out.

Special Bonus Video: What’s Your Favorite Records Management Joke?

As you know, we recently published the five central videos from our interview series, “5 Questions About Information Governance in 5 Minutes.” In this series, we asked 30 IG experts a number of definitional and serious questions about IG. Our experts were prepared for that. However, right at the end of the interview, I slipped in one surprise question. Since many of our interviewees have experience with records management, and records management isn’t known as the most light-hearted, spontaneous profession , I thought I would ask, “What’s your favorite records management joke?”

So that’s what I did. I love this video because it shows that this community has a great sense of humor and does not take itself so seriously –  a sure sign of health.

Next week we will be posting full interviews with each interviewee as well. You can also check out the six videos we have published so far on our YouTube channel.

And by the way, if you know any good records management jokes, please send them to me, or add them in the comments.